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 I am honored to have the opportunity to work with nurse leaders throughout the state of California"

Mary Wickman, PhD, RN
CACN President 2020

Dr. Mary Wickman, Director of Nursing at Vanguard University, serves as President of the prestigious California Association of Colleges of Nursing, CACN. The honor was bestowed in January 2020 and Dr. Wickman has been actively involved in political advocacy and advancing the mission of nursing education in California to better the nursing world during the COVID-19 crisis. 

When sworn in as the president of the ACNL in 2017 Dr. Wickman was quoted:

"I am honored to have the opportunity to work with nurse leaders throughout the state of California, advancing nursing professional practice, influencing health policy, and promoting quality health care in our rapidly changing health care system."

CACN Board of Directors

Her current research focus is on nurse well-being related to Care Programs for nurses, in particular Tea for the Soul"

Annette Callis,
Ph.D., University of San Diego; MSN, California State University Long Beach; BSN, University of Miami, Fl

Dr. Annette Callis, Professor and MSN Program Coordinator at Vanguard University, has published research related to moral distress and empowerment in critical care nurses in the American Journal of Critical Care. Her current research focus is on nurse well-being related to Care Programs for nurses, in particular Tea for the Soul, a hospital-based program addressing the emotional needs of nurses related to bereavement and stressful/traumatic workplace experiences.

Dr. Callis’ primary teaching interest is graduate student research. As thesis advisor, Dr. Callis mentors MSN students conducting research, endeavoring to improve patient care outcomes and the quality of nursing practice.

 I sincerely believe God has a calling for everyone, and I’m so happy to be part of this calling"

Miguel Rosado
Class of 2018

Vanguard University nursing program graduate Miguel Rosado remembers hiding on rooftops and in bushes from both the army and guerrilla fighters while growing up in El Salvador.

If either faction discovered him at age 12 or older, he would have been conscripted into one of Central America’s bloodiest civil wars. Like many Salvadorans caught between the factions, Rosado’s mother immigrated to the United States — he was 8 when she left — to work and send money home.

“I think that if I hadn’t gone through that experience with the civil war, I wouldn’t be as strong,” said Rosado, 40.

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