118: Slavery – From Compassion Fatigue to Empathy

During this episode 118, Slavery: from Compassion Fatigue to Empathy, Dr. Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak discuss the implications and the complexity of today’s slavery in the modern world. Sandra Morgan shared Shyima Hall’s story of her own experience of being taken as a child slave. Shyima was born in Egypt and at eight years old; her parents sold her to a family in order to pay off her eldest sister’s debt. Shyima worked for the family for a year in Egypt and then moved to the United States.

When she moved to the United States, Shyima slept outside in the garage in a small storage room that contained no windows or lighting. She was with them for over twenty two months and her job was to not only care for their five children, but to clean the home, cook, and do laundry. The family constantly told her that “you belong to us” almost every day. They threatened her stating she would never see her family again if she were to try to run away. Shyima was finally rescued when a neighbor called the police because she noticed that a young girl never left the house. After being rescued, she went into foster care and stayed in the US. Shyima’s one true desire was to become her own person. In 2007 her case finally ended and her traffickers were sentenced to prison. Shyima’s inspiring story encourages others to be a voice for someone else.

Be ambassadors of sharing stories and building relationships and if we do that we are not only studying the issue and making a difference but we are also understanding and appreciating the real human impact of slavery and refugee status that we see in the world today. When we understand these experiences, we move from compassion and compassion fatigue to empathy.

 

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

“Hidden Girl” by Shyima Hall

“Where the Wind Leads” By Vinh Chung

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

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Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

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Ensure Justice 2016 Events: Take the next step and register today!

ENSURE JUSTICE CONFERENCE 2016

MARCH 4-5, 2016

Location: Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, CA

 Register TODAY for our 9th Annual Ensure Justice Conference! There are so many different ways you can participate!

The Ensure Justice Conference is a two-day event focused on equipping teachers, law enforcement, students, and community members to protect and intervene for women and children at high-risk of exploitation and violence. The Ensure Justice Conference is hosted by the Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University.

This year, the Ensure Justice Conference focuses on the theme: A Marathon to End Human Trafficking: Train, Sustain, and Focus. 

This is an event that has a place for everyone to participate and learn how to play a role in the fight to end human trafficking.

We are hosting our first ever 5k Walk for Justice that will bring visual awareness to our community!

Major perks if you participate: FREE registration, FREE t-shirt, FREE Chick-fil-A lunch!

Click here to see the route

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-Conference Schedule 

-Registration

Compassion Night (click for details)

Open to the Community and Chapel credit for Vanguard Students!

Guest Speaker: Dr. Beth Grant, Founder of Project Rescue

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Questions about Ensure Justice, the 5K Walk or Compassion Night? Email gcwj@vanguard.edu or call our office at 714-966-6363. We hope to see you there!

 

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Join us February 26!

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Join us for the Lewis Wilson Institute for Pentecostal Studies for our first seminar taking place on Friday, February 26th at 2:00-4:00pm. This semester’s theme is “Your Daughters Shall Prophecy: Women of the Spirit.”

Dr. April Westbrook, Ph.D. Chair of the Department of Religion, will be speaking on the topic of “Empowered to do What is Right: Lessons in the Ethical Use of Power from Women in the Book of Samuel.”

Dr. Westbrook earned her doctorate degree from Claremont Graduate University. She teaches several foundational courses in the Religion curriculum and biblical Hebrew. She also regularly teaches courses in Old Testament historical books, the Pentateuch, and the book of Proverbs. As an ordained minister for over twenty-five years, Professor Westbrook also has great interest in issues concerning women in leadership and ministry roles. She regularly teaches related courses, as well as speaking at conferences, retreats, and chapel services.

The seminar will be held in Heath Lecture Hall 109, Vanguard University. Everyone is welcomed.

 

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Sandra Morgan in Influence Magazine

How Churches Can Fight Human Trafficking and Slavery in Their Own Backyards
SANDRA MORGAN JAN 22 2016
A neighbor called child welfare to report a child who did not attend school with the other five children living in a $1.6 million home in their upscale gated community. Authorities discovered a 12-year-old girl sold by her parents as a child maid in Egypt to cover her sister’s debt. Shyima worked seven days a week, from early in the morning until late at night. She slept in a converted room in the garage without ventilation and washed her own clothes in a bucket because she was too dirty to include them in the family laundry she did every day. Shyima never went to school, never learned English, and never saw a doctor.

Not far away, an 11-year-old had run away from her dysfunctional home looking for someone who cared. An older man befriended her, offered her a place to stay, gained her trust, and then sold her for sex.

How could these stories happen right here in the U.S.? How can we do something about it?

How Can Churches Best Respond?
Churches have a natural platform from which to contribute to many aspects of combatting human trafficking and slavery. A church shares common values and an established infrastructure, and it already engages in serving the community and meeting needs. The passage of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) in 2000 generated new awareness of human trafficking and the need for community education. As a result, many pastors and lay leaders rallied their congregations to respond to the crisis. However, as we study the patterns of human trafficking and slavery, it is clear that it is not simply a matter of rescuing victims. Intervention requires careful planning for aftercare. As this movement grows, it is imperative that efforts are sustainable and follow best practice models that ensure the safety and well-being of the volunteers, as well as the victims.

The TVPA-authorized global Trafficking in Persons Report offers guidance for community engagement in antitrafficking, using a four Ps model: prevention, protection, prosecution and partnership. This model identifies professional and community roles for an effective response to human trafficking. A careful assessment of a church’s expertise and resources can result in a sustainable and consistent compassion response that respects the intersection of public and private roles. The concept of engaging in the community to work together across agencies and organizations is a biblical pattern of salt and light. It is also a wise use of limited resources. A church may not have the resources to set up a residential care facility, but it can provide volunteers and even pro bono professional services, such as counseling, or English instruction for international victims.

Each congregation is unique, so there are no one-size-fits all strategies. However, a successful partnership begins with the following three steps.

1. Identify your expertise and resources. Prepare to join the battle is assessing available expertise and resources. This evaluation should include existing ministries, member skills and community activities. Many plans to fight human trafficking begin with, “Let’s start …” (fill in the blank). But the church may already have a ministry that is part of a critical prevention strategy, such as an afterschool program in a high-risk neighborhood. In addition, members may have years of children’s education experience, and facilities may include classrooms furnished by age group. Local expertise and resources can bridge the critical gap in prevention.

2. Study the issue and the language. Learn more about human trafficking — what it is and why it happens. Learn the correct terminology relating to trafficking laws and victim services. Common language will improve the interface with law enforcement and victim services, and it will reduce the risk of using language that misrepresents the crime and dehumanizes victims. It is important to understand that the media uses language that sells newspapers or attracts viewers and may often sensationalize at the cost of personal dignity.

3. Assess local need. Focus particularly on issues that increase the likelihood of someone exploiting youth and adults for labor or commercial sex. As a practitioner, I often wonder at the passion and resources local congregations invest in faraway places, without demonstrating awareness of the needs in their own backyards. A community assessment will uncover risk for modern slavery in labor markets, as well as commercial sexual exploitation. I recommend that groups begin with a simple exercise. Draw a tree, and ask the group to identify problems they can see in their community as leaves. For instance, one congregation identified homeless youth as a leaf. Another added poverty and a hypersexualized culture. Then look for the roots. Why are there so many homeless youth, and how can we help? The congregation learned that the local school district had a homeless student liaison that needed volunteers. It was not as exciting as going out on a rescue at 1:00 a.m., but it became an extremely rewarding community partnership that was sustainable and made a difference. It was salt and light. Additionally, it avoided unintentionally placing victims or volunteers in harm’s way.

A small urban church assessed its expertise and resources in relationship to the need in the community. The church was located only a block from a middle school and had classrooms (resource) it used only twice a week. Two of the members were experienced teachers (expertise). The church did not have significant financial resources, but members learned about the existing NetSmartz cyber-safety prevention resources, developed and funded in a public-private partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) and the FBI. The church offered an after-school Internet safety class, an excellent prevention tool that told neighbors, “We care about your children.”

Many local, state and federal programs need volunteers and partners to continue serving victims of human trafficking. Professionals within a local church often volunteer to provide victims with pro bono services, including dentistry, healthcare, counseling, life skills mentoring and even haircuts. These are examples of partnership, the fourth P for building a community safety net using expertise and resources. Community partnerships reduce duplication of efforts and steward limited resources well. Plunging in without careful evaluation and then winding up unable to sustain commitments can damage a church’s reputation.

A Biblical Prevention Model
Churches are already in a biblical position for prevention. Consider the first recorded example of child slavery prevention found in 2 Kings 4:1–7. The widow went to Elisha and told him creditors were going to take her two sons as slaves.

Debt bondage still happens today. Think about what your church would do. Take an offering to purchase their freedom? They will be back in debt again soon in order to survive. But Elisha didn’t even ask the boys’ names. Instead, he asked the widow what she had. She amended her first response from nothing to a flask of olive oil. That might have seemed like nothing to her since it was what people carried for refilling a lamp if they were going to be out after dark, much like carrying a spare battery. It wasn’t enough for cooking even one meal. Elisha instructed her to borrow jars from everyone, which engaged the entire community in what was happening. Then he told her to close the door and start pouring. God showed up, and when every jar was full, Elisha told her to sell the oil, pay the debts and live off the rest. He empowered the mother instead of rescuing the boys.

Two lessons among many in this story are that Elisha did not focus on the boys — no photos, no offering. He empowered the mother. Second, God showed up. Without God, human trafficking — slavery — is hopeless. The Church must show up. God created the Church to make a difference.

Becoming a community partner in the battle against human trafficking grows a church’s community presence. The church must play by the rules, avoid taking shortcuts and promote excellence in everything. Protecting the dignity and privacy of victims is a fundamental standard across the spectrum of professionals working to end human trafficking. It is even more vital for churches that understand the sacred call to serve the widow, the orphan and “the least of these” — people God created in His image.

 

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Volunteer with Us!

EJ16_A2Hello to all Vanguard students!

 

The Global Center for Women and Justice would like to extend an invitation to volunteer to all Vanguard students, staff ,and faculty for any or all of our 3 upcoming events!
Who and what is the Global Center for Women and Justice? Located in Scott 226, the Global Center is a faith-based organization that exists to advance the global status of women through research, education, advocacy, collaboration and hope. Whether in our backyard or on the opposite side of the world, we are preparing young women and men to understand the impact of gender issues.

As undergraduate students, volunteering with the Global center can widen your scope of life around you. Volunteering at our upcoming events can also show you how different aspects of life interrelate with each other. For example, human trafficking relates to law enforcement, homelessness, education, the juvenile court system, family life, and much more.

Volunteering also allows you to meet and network with local, state, national, or even international leaders and organizations working to combat such issues as human trafficking. Future employers look for volunteer hours on your resume as well, and it can boost the chances of you getting priority for a job interview.

Here are some events you can help volunteer at and learn valuable information: Keep in mind, you can work a shift of just a few hours, whatever your schedule allows.
Frontline Summit III – Identification, Intervention and Prevention of Child Sexual Exploitation will be held at Crown Plaza in Costa Mesa on Thursday, March 3rd from 8:30am – 5pm. We need 3-5 people to help with registration at 8:30am and keep the event running smoothly. You would NOT be required to stay for the whole day.

*   On Friday morning, March 4th, we will be hosting a 5K walk from the Crowne Plaza hotel on Bristol Street to Vanguard University in order to raise visual awareness about human trafficking. We need several volunteers to lead groups of 30 people on the 5Kwalk to Vanguard, ensuring the route and that traffic laws are being obeyed. OC Police Officers will be at stop lights to assist with crossing. Chick-fil-A lunch will be provided.

*  Friday March 4th, at 1pm will mark the beginning of the Ensure Conference. It will conclude on Saturday March 5th at 5pm. We need about 30 volunteers for the conference.
Volunteer roles for all events include:

*   Registration
*   Greeters
*   Speaker Care
*   Set Up & Teardown

Volunteering for the Ensure Conference provides free admission. Vanguard students can also register for WMST 212 to receive 1 unit for attending the conference and writing a short reflection paper.

 

Any questions, comments, or concerns can be addressed to gcwj@vanguard.edu<mailto:gcwj@vanguard.edu> or call 714-966-6363.

We hope you can partner with us to bring awareness and action to our community!

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117: The Essential Abolitionist – An Interview with John Vanek [PODCAST]

During this episode, Dr. Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak interview special guest John Vanek who is a speaker, consultant, and author, and a nationally recognized authority on human trafficking and the response to modern slavery. John managed the San Jose Police Department Human Trafficking Task Force from 2006-2011. 

John’s knowledge on the collaborative response to human trafficking and task force operations have been utilized by the United States Department of Justice, the Office of the United States Attorneys, California’s Office of the Attorney General, California POST, the California District Attorneys Association, the National Law Enforcement Training Network, the Not For Sale Campaign, Police One, the Freedom Network Training Institute, and other governmental and private organizations. 

 

John retired from the San Jose Police Department in the rank of lieutenant, holds a Master of Arts in Leadership from Saint Mary’s College of California, and is the author of the forth-coming book, The Essential Abolitionist: What You Need to Know About Human Trafficking & Modern Slavery. (To be released in January 2016.) To learn more about anti-trafficking efforts, check out GCWJ’s Human Trafficking Professional Courses Online.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Website: www.johnvanek.com

Twitter: @JohnJVanek

Facebook: The Essential Abolitionist

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

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116: A Marathon- Train, Sustain, Focus [PODCAST]

During this episode, Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak discuss details on the upcoming Ensure Justice Conference happening on March 4-5th. They also discuss with Sandra’s nephew, Bill Clements, on how to prepare for a marathon. In order to prepare for a marathon, you must set a goal in order to stay focus on what you hope to achieve. In planning a marathon, you must understand that rest days are just as important as training days. This relates to ending human trafficking because in order to do so, you must work as a community to reach your goal. Bill advises to watch out for one another to make sure you are getting enough rest. It is easy to get discouraged and burn out; you need each other if we are going to finish this.

Some tips on starting a marathon is to build your fitness up, and not always pressing to the ultimate capacity, especially not at the beginning. It requires focus to continue in a marathon and not create a budget that’s not sustainable. The ultimate goal of the Ensure Justice Conference is to reduce the vulnerability of the at risk population, to rescue victims, to free slaves, and to end the entire commerce of human trafficking. If we train, educate, and prepare people we will reach this goal. We can end human trafficking by keeping our focus on how important every single person is.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

http://www.vanguard.edu/gcwj/ensurejustice/

http://singletrackrunning.com/racing-team/

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

Jasmine Botello: Why did I become a Women’s Studies Minor?

It’s 12:30pm, and I find myself in the same disgusting predicament again. I am sitting on the bathroom toilet at the House of Blues restaurant half naked, breastfeeding my 3 month old son. And I think to myself, one day I am going to do something about this. Dumbfounded by this whole situation, I think of a clever solution. Why not when constructing a women’s restroom, they think about what women really do other than use the restroom? Oh yes, breastfeed and change diapers. So why not build a private stall that is specifically created to just meet that need? Because we live in a country where the needs for women and children are not priority. We live in a nation that does not provide or demand maternity leave for working mothers and where the state only pays 50% of a mother’s income as disability when on leave. How could this possibly be? If children are the future and women provide a majority of the nurturing for children since birth, mothers are heros! They are given the high duty of raising children with most men taking the back seat. Moms spend long nights cradling future leaders, politicians, doctors, teachers and scientist. Instead of being secluded to the bathroom stall, children and woman should be offered privacy and consideration. This is just one example of where we fail to recognize the extremely important role women play in rearing children and ultimately in society.

Why did I decide to become a Women’s studies minor? Even before I became a mother I knew and felt that women’s issues were misrepresented in government, legislation, work places, schools and the media. Women are seen as the weaker sex and made to feel as if they need to be more masculine in order to be suitable to run a business, be a doctor or lawyer. Therefore, we get a huge push from feminist activist who promote birth control, abortion, postponing marriage or not getting married at all. Children are seen as a barrier to women who want to advance their career. Instead of creating work places that are family friendly, many women are pushed to quit their jobs, eventually giving up on their dreams. However, what I found out long ago is that being a woman is a superior position and we should celebrate it. Women need to embrace their characteristics and uplift them. It takes strength, courage and selflessness to decide to carry a child. It’s hard work to raise a child, breastfeed and work full time. Yet, these are characteristics that should be celebrated about women. Corporate companies should want to hire woman and ask them to be on their leadership teams because they exhibit such admirable characteristics.
When my husband asked me to have a child, I was beside myself. I had just turned 26 and was not planning on starting a family until I was 30 years old. I was in the process of submitting my Law school applications and had just taken the LSAT. But he was adamant. It was now or never! And so I prayed and I thought about it and I made a decision. If we were going to have a child, I would still go to Law school but he would have to co-parent. We would do this together. Deciding to have a child was the best decision I ever made and I praise God for such a beautiful baby boy. Having a child was possible because I could work from home and set my own schedule. I have the flexibility to go to school, work and raise my son. At the same time, I don’t have to pay for day care because my husband’s schedule allows for him to watch our son while I am at school and work.
I became a Women’s Studies minor because I want to represent women and children and give the best defense. I want to create law that supports and encourages an egalitarian society in which women can be who they were created to be; a helpmate for men. At the same time, I want to raise my boy to respect women, to see them as his equal and eventually be a very loving and loyal husband. It is my desire and heart felt concern to bring to the forefront women’s issues and bring change that uplifts women and children as a future attorney. With the education that I received at Vanguard University as a Women’s Studies minor, I will strive to advocate for the cause of women and children.

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast logo

115: National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month [PODCAST]

 

In this podcast Sandie and Dave discuss the difference between Prevention and Awareness and why it is important to include slavery in the discussion around National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month 2016.

In 2008 we started recognizing the Anti-Human Trafficking movement with a DAY – January 11 – as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day.  One day was not enough and it became a month. A few years ago we celebrated a milestone when the Presidential Proclamation shifted from awareness to PREVENTION.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Presidential Proclamation- National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe