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116: A Marathon- Train, Sustain, Focus [PODCAST]

During this episode, Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak discuss details on the upcoming Ensure Justice Conference happening on March 4-5th. They also discuss with Sandra’s nephew, Bill Clements, on how to prepare for a marathon. In order to prepare for a marathon, you must set a goal in order to stay focus on what you hope to achieve. In planning a marathon, you must understand that rest days are just as important as training days. This relates to ending human trafficking because in order to do so, you must work as a community to reach your goal. Bill advises to watch out for one another to make sure you are getting enough rest. It is easy to get discouraged and burn out; you need each other if we are going to finish this.

Some tips on starting a marathon is to build your fitness up, and not always pressing to the ultimate capacity, especially not at the beginning. It requires focus to continue in a marathon and not create a budget that’s not sustainable. The ultimate goal of the Ensure Justice Conference is to reduce the vulnerability of the at risk population, to rescue victims, to free slaves, and to end the entire commerce of human trafficking. If we train, educate, and prepare people we will reach this goal. We can end human trafficking by keeping our focus on how important every single person is.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

http://www.vanguard.edu/gcwj/ensurejustice/

http://singletrackrunning.com/racing-team/

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

Jasmine Botello: Why did I become a Women’s Studies Minor?

It’s 12:30pm, and I find myself in the same disgusting predicament again. I am sitting on the bathroom toilet at the House of Blues restaurant half naked, breastfeeding my 3 month old son. And I think to myself, one day I am going to do something about this. Dumbfounded by this whole situation, I think of a clever solution. Why not when constructing a women’s restroom, they think about what women really do other than use the restroom? Oh yes, breastfeed and change diapers. So why not build a private stall that is specifically created to just meet that need? Because we live in a country where the needs for women and children are not priority. We live in a nation that does not provide or demand maternity leave for working mothers and where the state only pays 50% of a mother’s income as disability when on leave. How could this possibly be? If children are the future and women provide a majority of the nurturing for children since birth, mothers are heros! They are given the high duty of raising children with most men taking the back seat. Moms spend long nights cradling future leaders, politicians, doctors, teachers and scientist. Instead of being secluded to the bathroom stall, children and woman should be offered privacy and consideration. This is just one example of where we fail to recognize the extremely important role women play in rearing children and ultimately in society.

Why did I decide to become a Women’s studies minor? Even before I became a mother I knew and felt that women’s issues were misrepresented in government, legislation, work places, schools and the media. Women are seen as the weaker sex and made to feel as if they need to be more masculine in order to be suitable to run a business, be a doctor or lawyer. Therefore, we get a huge push from feminist activist who promote birth control, abortion, postponing marriage or not getting married at all. Children are seen as a barrier to women who want to advance their career. Instead of creating work places that are family friendly, many women are pushed to quit their jobs, eventually giving up on their dreams. However, what I found out long ago is that being a woman is a superior position and we should celebrate it. Women need to embrace their characteristics and uplift them. It takes strength, courage and selflessness to decide to carry a child. It’s hard work to raise a child, breastfeed and work full time. Yet, these are characteristics that should be celebrated about women. Corporate companies should want to hire woman and ask them to be on their leadership teams because they exhibit such admirable characteristics.
When my husband asked me to have a child, I was beside myself. I had just turned 26 and was not planning on starting a family until I was 30 years old. I was in the process of submitting my Law school applications and had just taken the LSAT. But he was adamant. It was now or never! And so I prayed and I thought about it and I made a decision. If we were going to have a child, I would still go to Law school but he would have to co-parent. We would do this together. Deciding to have a child was the best decision I ever made and I praise God for such a beautiful baby boy. Having a child was possible because I could work from home and set my own schedule. I have the flexibility to go to school, work and raise my son. At the same time, I don’t have to pay for day care because my husband’s schedule allows for him to watch our son while I am at school and work.
I became a Women’s Studies minor because I want to represent women and children and give the best defense. I want to create law that supports and encourages an egalitarian society in which women can be who they were created to be; a helpmate for men. At the same time, I want to raise my boy to respect women, to see them as his equal and eventually be a very loving and loyal husband. It is my desire and heart felt concern to bring to the forefront women’s issues and bring change that uplifts women and children as a future attorney. With the education that I received at Vanguard University as a Women’s Studies minor, I will strive to advocate for the cause of women and children.

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115: National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month [PODCAST]

 

In this podcast Sandie and Dave discuss the difference between Prevention and Awareness and why it is important to include slavery in the discussion around National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month 2016.

In 2008 we started recognizing the Anti-Human Trafficking movement with a DAY – January 11 – as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day.  One day was not enough and it became a month. A few years ago we celebrated a milestone when the Presidential Proclamation shifted from awareness to PREVENTION.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Presidential Proclamation- National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

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New GCWJ Staff: Brittany Skiles

Brittany Skiles is a Vanguard Alum who just graduated in December 2015 with her Bachelors Degree in Sociology and a Minor in Women’s Studies. Her study of emphasis has been on human trafficking, with her final research project on how well Orange County healthcare providers are trained to identify and respond to victims of human trafficking. She has been involved with the Global Center for Women & Justice for the past 3 years and served in 2014 as the club president of Live2free, leading a team of college students to go out and educate their peers about labor and sex trafficking. She has also been a student worker for GCWJ this past academic semester.

“Getting involved with the Global Center for Women & Justice and learning from Dr. Sandra Morgan has completely changed my perspective on  women’s issues in the community and around the world. These opportunities have greatly influenced my career choice and my outlook on life. I am grateful to the Center for the education they provided while earning my degree and now for the privileged to work in their offices for such an important cause.”

Presently, Brittany will be assisting GCWJ full-time while Coordinator Nadia Hernandez is on maternity leave this spring. Brittany and her husband Lance, also a Vanguard student, live in Santa Ana and are enjoying their first year of marriage.

 

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114: From Awareness to Engagement – The Role of Education [PODCAST]

During this episode, Dr. Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak discuss various educational opportunities offered through the Global Center for Women and Justice to study the issues, be a voice, and make a difference. GCWJ is excited that three of four online courses are completed: Human Trafficking , Human Trafficking Aftercare, Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children, and Human Trafficking Ethics. GCWJ offers four Human Trafficking Professional Courses designed to provide a comprehensive overview of anti-trafficking efforts. The courses are aligned with best practice models following the 4 P’s model of Prevention, Protection, Prosecution, and Partnership adopted by the US State Department’s Office to Combat and Monitor Trafficking in Persons.

The GCWJ will hosts it’s annual Ensure Justice Conference on March 4-5, 2016. The Conference theme is A Marathon to End Human Trafficking. National and community leaders, students, law enforcement, teachers, juvenile justice and child welfare professionals will purse a regimen to Train, Sustain, and Focus in developing skills and sustaining efforts to improve prevention, provide more aftercare resources and focus on local, national, and global opportunities to join the race! Students will engage with professionals that may open doors for internships or grow understanding for future professional goals as we integrate our faith to study the issues, be a voice, and make a difference to end modern day slavery.

 

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Online Professional Courses on Human Trafficking

Ensure Justice Conference

Hands That Heal TOT

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast Toolkit #1 & #2

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast Toolkit #3

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

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Pray for Freedom

“Prayer moves the arm that moves the world.” C.H. Spurgeon

 

Join the Global Center for Women and Justice in partnership with the Faith Alliance Against Slavery and Trafficking for Pray for Freedom! With over 21 million people living in slavery today we need to ask the author of freedom, Christ, to end human trafficking. Join with abolitionists around the globe as we challenge slavery through prayer.

Attend in Person: The live event is at the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University (*at the Newport Mesa Church on campus*)
Attend Online: Join us online for the live streaming event. Link: http://www.vanguard.edu/gcwj/prayforfreedom/

 

Pray for Freedom
January 23, 2016 Starting at 3 PM PST/ 6PM EST.
Newport Mesa Church
Vanguard University Campus
55 Fair Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626

RSVP by joining the Facebook Event

Would you like to host a simulcast? Email: faast@faastinternational.org.

 


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113: How can I open a home for victims of CSEC? [PODCAST]


During this episode, Dr. Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak interview Joyce Capelle who has been the Chief Executive Officer of Crittenton Services for Children and Families of Southern California since 1998. Prior to joining the agency in 1997, she worked as an administrator in public education and in hospital management for more than 35 years in the human services field. She earned a Master’s degree in Public Administration with a Public Policy focus from California State University, Long Beach and a Juris Doctorate degree from Pacific West College of Law. She has also served on a number of local, state and national committees on child and family welfare issues. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the California Alliance for Child and Family Services and is Immediate Past Chair of the Fullerton Chamber of  Commerce.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Crittenton

Crittenton InSight Program for CSEC girls

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

Ensure Justice 2016 Call for Papers

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The Global Center for Women and Justice’s annual Ensure Justice Conference is releasing a Call for Papers. The 2016 Conference theme is A Marathon to End Human Trafficking. National and community leaders, students, law enforcement, teachers, juvenile justice and child welfare professionals will pursue a regimen to Train, Sustain, and Focus in developing our skills and sustaining efforts to improve prevention, provide more aftercare resources and focus on local, national and global opportunities to join the race.

We invite abstract submissions of up to 300 words from students and professionals with academic or professional research. Please fill out our Ensure Justice 2016 Call for Papers and include a brief resume or CV. Deadline to submit an abstract is January 29, 2015 to gcwj@vanguard.edu. The presentations will be 20 minutes with 15 minutes for discussion in a workshop session format. We are seeking presentations of facts, knowledge, ideas, theories, on-the-ground approaches, methods, program evaluations, research agendas, and research needs.

The committee will expect a commitment to attend by at least one of the accepted presenters, with a non-refundable deposit of $50, by February 5, 2016, for presenters to remain on the program. The deposit may be paid at the registration website. For papers selected, the remainder of the registration fee will be complementary.

Sending an abstract and/or any other materials will constitute a release of copyright, and allow the materials they present (in written, video, audio, or graphic form) to be made available on the conference website after the conference. No paper proceedings will be published, but the presented materials will be available on the conference website for the indefinite future.

The deadline for submission of materials, other than the abstract and printed materials, to be placed on the website is February 5, 2016. Conference presenters may include a formal paper, PowerPoint slides, film, or anything arising from their presented work. If nothing is submitted, their abstract will be placed on the website as directed by the staff.

If you have questions about presentations, please contact gcwj@vanguard.edu.

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112: Juvenile Justice Inspiring Hope- An interview with the Hon. Maria Hernandez [PODCAST]

During this episode, Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak interview special guest Honorable Maria Hernandez who discusses the November 20, 2015 Juvenile Justice Summit: Inspiring Hope.  She explains the significance of the collaboration represented across judicial, educational, child welfare, and research sectors. The Hon. Hernandez was appointed Presiding Judge of the Juvenile Court, Orange County on January 1, 2014. Prior to her appointment as Juvenile Court Presiding Judge she was responsible for both dependency and delinquency inventories, presided over Juvenile Drug Court, Dependency drug Court and the Boys Court program, and chaired the task force relating to Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC). Judge Hernandez has been assigned to the Juvenile Justice Court since 2010 and prior to that assignment served at the West Justice Center. Currently, Judge Hernandez also serves as a member of Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye’s “Keeping Kids in School and Out of Court Initiative” Steering Committee, the Judicial Council of California’s “Advisory Committee on Providing Access and Fairness,” and is a faculty member of the Judicial Council of California’s Center for Judicial Education and Research (CJER). Judge Hernandez is an active member of numerous law and community related organizations. As the Presiding Judge of Juvenile Court, Judge Hernandez maintains a small inventory of cases while working with juvenile justice partners in the daily administration of juvenile court.

The podcast also discusses California Chief Justice of California Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye remarks as well as highlights of the research presented by Dr. Elizabeth Cauffman and Dr. Jodi Quas (University of California, Irvine). An overview of the cross sector panels demonstrated how important collaboration is to bridge the gaps in services to vulnerable youth. The “Meant to Make It” panel featured Department of Education, Health Care Agency, The District Attorney Gand Reduction Intervention Partnership and the Public Defender with an emphasis on early identification and intervention.

Please take a moment to rate the Podcast on ITunes!

Resources:

Ensure Justice 2016 Conference

Juvenile Justice Summit: Inspiring Hope Program

Dr. Sandra Morgan’s new blog

Global Center for Women and Justice

Like us on Facebook!

Haven’t been receiving our monthly newsletter? Head over to our homepage and subscribe today using the box in the bottom left corner!

Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

For updates about the Global Center for Women & Justice at Vanguard University, please LIKE us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/VUGCWJ

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe

Hands That Heal Training

Hands That Heal Training

The Hands That Heal Community-Based Edition is used in participatory, informal training sessions called Training of Trainers (TOTs) to prepare others to teach Hands That Heal in their community.

December 14, 15, & 16, 2015

Vanguard University Costa Mesa, CA

Scott Academic Center, Room 227

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration: $150+

Please order and bring the Community Based Curriculum (2 volumes)

(available at www.faastinternational.org/hands-that-heal)  

The Academic Text is optional, but may be ordered at the same site.

 

What is Hands That Heal?Hands That Heal: International Curriculum to Train Caregivers of Trafficking Survivors provides a comprehensive approach to serving victims of trafficking and educating caregivers so that they may appropriately and effectively provide care and support. This curriculum was developed in two editions: Community-Based and Academic Edition.How is it used?Hands That Heal is being used by secular and faith-based universities, churches and community groups to inspire people to engage in the battle against human trafficking and to train people on how to provide transformational care to survivors of trafficking.

What is the purpose of the training?

To provide a community-based curriculum in an interactive educational format that can be used in local communities and churches around the world to:

  • Make people aware of the issues of sex trafficking;
  • Inform them of the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors; and,
  • Train potential caregivers in introductory transformational care. The Hands That Heal Community-Based Edition is used in participatory, informal training sessions called Training of Trainers (TOTs) to prepare others to teach Hands That Heal Curriculum.

 To register online: https://connect.vanguard.edu/event/handsthatheal  

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