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Merry Christmas 2016!

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132: Ensure Justice: Principle and Practice

The Ensure Justice Conference is GCWJ’s annual educational collaboration.  March 2017 marks the 10 year anniversary of Ensure Justice and the theme will be to “Build a Strong Child.” The question is how do we reduce the risk for kids and take preventative action against the rapidly growing industry of pornography and sex trafficking. The real secret to prevention is resiliency. To make “ensuring justice” the principle and the practice a highly valued aspect of fighting trafficking we have to make the story about resilience important. Collaboration happens at Ensure Justice when people get together to understand the value of advocating against human trafficking. Proverbs 31:8, “Be a voice for those that have no voice; ensure justice for those being crushed.” Ensure Justice conference will be focusing on building strong children in our community, around schools, and globally.

Resources:

Ensure Justice Conference

Anti-Human Trafficking Certificate Program

Global Center for Women and Justice

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Pray for Freedom: Challenging Slavery 2017

 

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Pray for Freedom in Partnership with FAAST INTERNATIONAL
3-5pm PST Saturday, January 28th at Vanguard University/Newport Mesa Church

3:00pm-4:30pm: Prayers
Our communities will gather to pray for freedom for victims of labor and sex trafficking. Partner organizations and community leaders will open the prayer with a worldwide prayer for wisdom, resources, and divine intervention to free captives.

We will pray for the unique issues of widows, single mothers, refugees, foster kids, immigrants and vulnerable communities because of poverty, gender, conflict, and violence. We will also pray for wisdom to make a difference for community leaders that represent government, ethnic minorities, and churches.

Our final focus will reflect on prayers for change in our own hearts and communities that will reduce demand driven by greed, pornography, and violence.

4:30pm-5:00pm: Call to Action
The final call to action will focus a call to action to help us recognize victims, understand how we can serve, and engage the local church community in everyday responses that make a difference.

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131: RAAP – Pornography: Fantasy or Reality

In this episode, Director Sandra Morgan and GCWJ Board member Dave Stachowiak discuss the link between pornography and sex trafficking. Sandie Morgan did a webinar with the Religious Alliance Against Pornography to investigate this link which is an issue that most people can agree on. Pornography drives the demand for trafficking and is closely linked to the prosperity of the sex trafficking. The genre of pornography has become increasingly more violent as the appetite of viewers has become more demanding for more variety, and younger victims. The general public needs to understand the ramifications of this type of abuse on young people, for those involved in the production and for those consuming the pornography products as a sex education resource. Pornography is NOT a victimless crime- how can we protect our children?

Resources:

Porn: The New Sex-Education

RAAP Webinar: Religious Association against Pornography 

Podcast 37: Interview with Harmony Dust

Treasures Website

Netsmartz Resources: National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

It’s Okay to Tell Video

Anti-Human Trafficking Certificate Program

Global Center for Women and Justice

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(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

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Success of Life Without Parole Showing

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Life Without Parole was sold out on its last weekend at the Edgemar Center for the Arts in Santa Monica! The audiences were captivated and moved by the experience, many stayed and engaged in following conversations. Written by Warren Doody and Directed by Susan Berkompas, this play is a tribute to the late Dr. Elizabeth Leonard who devoted her work to telling the hidden story of abused women.

In the mid-1990s, Dr. Elizabeth Dermody Leonard entered the gates of the California Institution for Women at Chino with the purpose of interviewing forty-two women serving long sentences for killing their abusive partners. The result of this research was Dr. Leonard’s book, Convicted Survivors: The Imprisonment of Battered Women Who Kill. Ten years later, playwright Warren Doody transformed this work into Life Without Parole, a play that tells the story of Helen Broker as she faces a parole board hearing for the first time, and who takes the audience on a journey through the tragic underworld of domestic violence.

Reviews:

Hands That Heal Training

Hands That Heal Training

The Hands That Heal Community-Based Edition is used in participatory, informal training sessions called Training of Trainers (TOTs) to prepare others to teach Hands That Heal in their community.

December 12, 13, & 14, 2016

Vanguard University Costa Mesa, CA

Scott Academic Center, Room 227

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration: $150+

Please order and bring the Community Based Curriculum (2 volumes)

(Books available for purchase at:

www.faastinternational.org/hands-that-heal)

The Academic Text is optional, but may be ordered at the same site.

 

What is Hands That Heal?

Hands That Heal: International Curriculum to Train Caregivers of Trafficking Survivors provides a comprehensive approach to serving victims of trafficking and educating caregivers so that they may appropriately and effectively provide care and support. This curriculum was developed in two editions: Community-Based and Academic Edition.How is it used?Hands That Heal is being used by secular and faith-based universities, churches and community groups to inspire people to engage in the battle against human trafficking and to train people on how to provide transformational care to survivors of trafficking.

What is the purpose of the training?

To provide a community-based curriculum in an interactive educational format that can be used in local communities and churches around the world to:

  • Make people aware of the issues of sex trafficking;
  • Inform them of the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors; and,
  • Train potential caregivers in introductory transformational care. The Hands That Heal Community-Based Edition is used in participatory, informal training sessions called Training of Trainers (TOTs) to prepare others to teach Hands That Heal Curriculum.

To register online: www.vanguard.edu/handsthatheal

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State Department Fellow Khot Deng

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Khot Deng is a State Department Fellow with the Community Solutions Plan and he is at GCWJ until December. The Community Solutions Program is a professional development program for the best and brightest global community leaders (fellows) working in Environmental Issues; Tolerance and Conflict Resolution; Transparency and Accountability; and, Women and Gender Issues. During this fellowship with us, he hopes to learn about programs to preserve children’s rights, and promote gender especially among women in fragmented society. Khot also wants to develop his skills and knowledge in areas of project design, project management and monitoring and evaluation. Upon returning from the Community Solutions Program, Khot plans to work to increase awareness on gender equity among different ethnic groups in his country by implementing gender awareness education seminaries and workshop. We are pleased to have him at the Global Center for Women and Justice!

As Khot grew up in multiple refugees camps in different African countries, separated by war from his family at age 7 for 20 years, his childhood experiences really inspired him to want to fight injustices for the rest of his life. He decided to work with vulnerable and marginalized groups after he graduate from high school. He began to worked with refugees youths to improve their lives, promoted justice and prevent them from drugs abuse and other harmful practices. He also worked to promote and create community awareness of rights for people with disabilities to be respected and considered by their community. He is a strong voice in his community because he stands up against the norm in a way that is very courageous.

After the signing of a peace agreement in his country (Sudan) which ended the 21 years civil war and led to secession of South Sudan (which is his country now), Khot started working with an international nongovernmental organization call “Right To Play” as a coordinator to help in the prevention of child abuse and promotion of child rights. He also helped in the demobilization and reintegration of child soldiers back to their community in which he lobbied the concerning military departments to discharge children who are forced to serve in the military.

Through his experiences of working with marginalized women in his community, Khot discovered that the state is currently failing to ensure the policy of gender equality toward women implement it in the statutory courts and constitution. The constant devaluation of women is evident in the many cases of injustice and appear to be structurally rooted by direct subordination of women in the culture. This means that there is a possibility to making change and creating a revised culture of gender equity in the community. With the appointment of few women to customary court in most South Sudanese communities, it is evident that the traditional chiefs are now open to change for the equality of women’s rights and the promotion of women in decision making. This is a sign that there is a possibility to change the way a woman’s position is viewed in these communities and Khot believes it will only happen if “we” create more awareness and promote gender equality in the communities.

In 2011, Khot observed the injustice being done to women in his own community, especially in South Sudan where 85% of the population still follows traditional norms, customs and customary law. Women are considered to be property of their husband and harmful practices like forced marriage, under-age marriage and domestic violence are commonly happening to women, yet most men and women are unaware of the injustice their cultures has caused to women. Legal conflicts are taken to traditional courts or to elders’ councils that consist primarily of men. Khot formed a national nonprofit organization in which he now serves as project development officer to help in creating awareness on women rights and empowering women in his own community and in South Sudan as whole.

During Khot’s fellowship at Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University, he will be working closely to gain knowledge from private and public institutions within Orange County on how to prevent injustice, promote gender equality and then return back to his home country in South Sudan to help in improving women’s rights and equality in his community.

 

 

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130: Dr. Becca Johnson – Trauma Sensitivity 

In this episode, Director Sandra Morgan and GCWJ Board member Dave Stachowiak introduce Dr. Becca Johnson who is the International program director at Rescue Freedom International. Dr. Johnson discusses the strategy of trauma sensitivity and how it is different from trauma informed. She shares that by teaching trauma sensitive care instead of just trauma informed care, she wants people to engage their hearts and empathy, not just their head. It is not enough that they just have knowledge about what trauma is and how it affects people, but that they would truly understand as much as they can from a heart level as well.

We have to ask what’s going on with the survivor’s emotions, in the thinking processes. When this is understood, it makes outreach more effective. It breaks down barriers because those helping can understand by sharing some common thoughts and feelings. To be trauma sensitive is also being culturally sensitive which leads to being more empathetic.

Resources:

Anti-Human Trafficking Certificate Program

Global Center for Women and Justice

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Contact us with questions, comments, or suggestions:

(714) 966-6360
gcwj@vanguard.edu

CLICK HERE for FAQs about podcasts and how to subscribe