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English & Spanish Adjunct Professors

  • Professor Crystal Couch, ccouch@vanguard.edu M.A., English Literature, Chapman University.  Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Researched Writing.
  • Professor Hannah Feduk hfeduk@apu.edu M.A., English Literature, Chapman University. Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Persuasive Writing, Researched Writing, and Literary Perspectives.
  • Professor Amy Hoffman amy.hoffman@vanguard.edu M.A., Graduate Education, Vanguard University.  Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Writing-Intensive Cornerstone, Persuasive Writing, Researched Writing, and Children’s Literature.
  • Dr. Jessica Miller jessica.miller@vanguard.edu Doctor of Public Health, Loma Linda University. M.A., Graduate Education, Azusa Pacific University. Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Persuasive Writing, Researched Writing, and SSMP for prospective English teachers.
  • Professor Karrie Preasmyer karrie.preasmyer@vanguard.edu M.A., English Literature, Mercy College. Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Persuasive Writing, Researched Writing, Literary Perspectives, and Modern Grammar & Advanced Composition.
  • Professor Arleen Salazar arleen.salazar@vanguard.edu M.A., Graduate Education, Vanguard University. Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Writing-Intensive Cornerstone, Persuasive Writing, and Researched Writing.
  • Professor Natasha Szala natasha.szala@vanguard.edu M.A., Graduate Education, Vanguard University. Adjunct Professor of English. Teaching interests in Persuasive Writing, Researched Writing, Literary Perspectives, Children’s Literature, and Professional Writing.
  • Professor Fernando Tamara fernando.tamara@vanguard.edu M.A. in progress, Leadership Studies, Vanguard University. Adjunct Professor of Spanish. Director of the Jesse Miranda Center for Hispanic Leadership & Urban Studies. Teaching interests in Spanish language, pastoral ministries, and Chicano Studies.

English & Spanish Adjunct Resources

Adjunct Faculty Resources

Our Provost’s Office created a resources page devoted to adjunct professors.

Professional Development Resources

Recommended Handbooks

Composition instructors may use a combination of one or more of the following writing guides.

Sample English Syllabi

Sample Student Papers

English Core Curriculum

CORE 102C: Writing-Intensive Cornerstone (3 units) Guidelines for CORE 102C Writing-Intensive Cornerstone Catalog Description: This course is open to Freshmen only.  A writing-intensive introduction to university life and learning, and to the academic and social skills needed for success.  Includes instruction in basic reading and writing skills with a diversity right curriculum, social outings, and a community service component.  A failing grade must be made up prior to advancement to the Sophomore level.  Students will be placed into this course with a 450 or lower SAT Verbal score or a 17 ACT score or lower.  Students without SAT/ACT scores are required to take the First-Year Language Assessment during Orientation Week.  This course must be taken prior to ENGL 120C, and both this course and ENGL 120C must be passed before a student can take ENGL 220C. Students will be able to . . .

  • Demonstrate basic sentence-level and paragraph-level writing skills.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of grammar rules in writing assignments.
  • Use appropriate tone and diction for a focused subject / audience.
  • Engage in peer-editing and other revision-based activities.
  • Develop academic and social skills for college success.
  • Understand how to use the campus library and peer-reviewed journal databases.
  • Develop competencies in diversity-related knowledge, self-examination, and personal & social engagement.

ENGLISH 120C: Persuasive Writing (3 units) Guidelines for ENGL 120C Persuasive Writing, First-Year Level College Composition Catalog Description: Exposition and argument at the college level. The course emphasizes writing, revising and editing, reading, research skills, and mechanics. Course must be passed with a “C” (not “C-“) or better to enroll in ENGL 220C. Students with a Verbal SAT score of 570 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher may place out of this course into ENGL 220C. Students will be able to . . .

  • Write for a college-level audience.
  • Use appropriate tone and diction for focused subject / audience.
  • Develop a multi-level purpose statement (thesis / hypothesis).
  • Develop a persuasive analysis using argumentation strategies.
  • Write in a stylistically compelling and grammatically accurate expository style.
  • Summon relevant, coherent, well-organized evidence to support claims.
  • Recognize logical fallacies and use inductive / deductive reasoning.
  • Analyze and evaluate informational texts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write a visual media analysis.
  • Avoid plagiarism by understanding specific examples studied & discussed.
  • Use citation styles appropriate to the discipline(s).
  • Write at least 20 cumulative pages of persuasion (revisions included).
  • Use one or more of the following collaborative revision processes: Portfolios, individual conferencing, peer-editing, workshopping, and/or Writing Center.
  • Use a writing handbook and/or on-line writing guides.

ENGLISH 220C: Researched Writing (3 units) Guidelines for ENGL 220C Researched Writing, Sophomore-Level College Composition Catalog Description: Prerequisites: ENGL 120C and, when required, a passing grade in ENGL 111 or Core 102C. Interpretive and analytic writing, including several problem-solving research-based papers investigating topics related to class themes. The course emphasizes writing, revising and editing, reading, analytical skills, and computer technology (word processing, Internet research) and reinforces those skills learned in ENGL 120C. Taught in the computer lab. Must be passed with a “C” (not “C-”) or better to fulfill the core curriculum requirement. Students may receive credit for English 220C by taking research and writing courses offered by departments other than English that meet standards set and approved by the Core Curriculum Committee. Students will be able to . . .  

  • Write for a college-level audience.
  • Apply critical thinking and writing skills from ENGL 120C such as argumentation strategies.
  • Evaluate, integrate, & cite relevant information from credible secondary sources.
  • Understand how to paraphrase, summarize, quote directly, and cite secondary sources.
  • Use information technology for research.
  • Create, edit, and publish on-line digital texts.
  • Write article reviews.
  • Compose an annotated bibliography.
  • Avoid plagiarism, with specific examples studied & discussed.
  • Use a citation style appropriate to discipline.
  • Demonstrate the ability to critique visual culture.
  • Write at least 25 cumulative pages of researched writing (revisions included).
  • Use one or more of the following collaborative revision processes: Portfolios, individual conferencing, peer-editing, workshopping, and/or Writing Center.
  • Use a writing handbook and/or on-line writing guides.

ENGLISH 230C: Literary Perspectives (3 units) Guidelines for ENGL 230C Literary Perspectives, Sophomore-Level Introduction to Literature Catalog Description: Introduces the student to a variety of literary genres as well as diverse authors, cultures, and experiences. This course also covers the tools and concepts necessary to the understanding and interpretation of literature. Students engage in classroom discussion, write papers, and take a variety of quizzes and exams. Students will be able to . . .

  • Understand and interpret literary expressions in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama and/or film.
  • Consider literature as a venue of conversation for issues central to human experience.
  • Apply college-level critical reading and analytical writing abilities to projects.
  • Engage the diverse world of ideas through a perspective of Christian faith.
  • Understand terms and methods central to the study of literature as an academic discipline.
  • Demonstrate socio-cultural awareness through writing projects, assigned readings, and class discussion.