Department of Business & Management (DBM)

Values, Goals & Policies

CORE VALUES

All Department of Business courses support and integrate the core values of the Vanguard University Department of Business and Management:

  • Integration of Faith
  • Mentorship
  • Academic Rigor and Substance
  • Continuous Value Added Partnerships

VANGUARD UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL TARGETS & GOALS

All courses support and integrate the educational targets and goals of Vanguard University:

  • Intellectual Engagement
  • Aesthetic Expression
  • Spiritual Formation          
  • Responsible Stewardship
  • Professional Excellence
  • Socio-cultural Responsiveness

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS & FOUNDATIONAL PRINCIPLES

The Department of Business and Management has identified the following fundamental skills and foundational principles that are essential learning objectives for undergraduate Business majors.  Fundamental skills relate to general knowledge and personal abilities that graduates will carry with them into their careers and lives.  The primary fundamental skills and foundational principles for this course are shown in bold.  Foundational principles require learning accomplishment in areas directly related to business disciplines, and form the core degree requirements within Vanguard’s business programs.

Fundamental Skills:

  • Communication Skills
  • Teamwork and Project Management
  • Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Decision Making
  • Ethical Reasoning
  • Business Tools and Technology
  • Change Dynamics

Foundational Principles:

  • Accounting
  • Management and Leadership
  • Marketing
  • Legal and Regulatory
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Global Dimensions of Business

Assessment Measures

Vanguard University is a learning organization dedicated to the continuous improvement of its programs and student outcomes. Students therefore should expect regular assessment to measure their progress toward specific goals and to identify areas where program and outcome improvements can be made. Students are encouraged to participate in this process by engaging in regular self-assessment, and by offering suggestions for program development.

Your grade will be based on a number of different elements. Your success in the course does not hinge on any single outcome. Your attendance and participation in class as well as independent reading and study of your text assignments, are key contributors as to how well you will do.

Course Grading

“Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in all business courses required for undergraduate majors and minors in DBM.”
For more information, please see the 2015-2016 Catalog. 

Grading Scale:

A                                              94-100%

A-                                            90-93%

B+                                           87-89%

B                                              83-86%

B-                                             80-82%

C+                                           77-79%

C                                              73-76%

C-                                            70-72%

D+                                           67-69%

D                                             63-66%

D-                                            60-62%

F                                              below 60%

Disabilities

The Disability Services Office offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and the Disability Services Office. If you have not yet established services through the Disability Services Office, but have a temporary or permanent disability that requires accommodations (this can include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impairments), you are welcome to contact the Disability Services Office at 714-619-6484 or disabilityservices@vanguard.edu.

Classroom Diversity

As students and faculty at Vanguard University of Southern California, and foremost as Christian believers, we endeavor to communicate with honesty and confidentiality, to speak with encouraging and edifying words, and to create a safe environment where we shelter one another with love when vulnerabilities arise. This classroom intends to foster a Christ-centered community that promotes appreciation and respect for individuals, enhances the potential of its members, and values differences in gender, ethnicity, race, abilities, and generation.

The university expects its students to excel in four diversity learning outcomes:

• Knowledge: Demonstrates knowledge of multiple cultural perspectives and global experiences by articulating the value of diversity through reports, presentations, examinations, field-work, and discipline-appropriate projects.

• Self-Examination: Examines one’s own attitudes, values, and assumptions and examines their impact. Evaluates one’s own attitudes, assumptions, and behavior towards diversity concerns and issues by recognizing, examining,
and challenging underlying assumptions and prejudices through coursework such as self-reflective essays, reading responses, and journal entries, with the recognition that such work is a life-long endeavor.

• Personal Engagement: Engages others with civility, empathy, honesty and responsibility with awareness of equity issues such as power dynamics and social privilege in these interactions. Demonstrates respectful and appropriate behavior when interacting with people of different genders, generation, ethnicity, race, national origin, socioeconomic status, and ability by developing sensitivity to equity issues (such as power dynamics and social privilege) through field experience, research, and analytical reading and writing.

• Social Engagement: Challenges past, present and future discrimination and privilege of individuals, societies, groups and institutions. Identifies and begins to seek out transformative and redemptive opportunities in the church, in society, and in the evolving realities of global change through academic, co-curricular, internship, and vocational opportunities.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Integrity

The Department of Business and Management, as an entity within a Christian institution, seeks to operate according to the highest standards of integrity. Mutual respect among all members of the DBM community (students, faculty, and staff) establishes an environment in which learning can take place. Therefore, members of the DBM community are expected to conduct themselves with proper respect toward each other. For the benefit of the community, class time is to be valued through proper preparation, timely attendance, adherence to established deadlines, appropriate use of electronic equipment, and suitable attire. Academic work should always represent members’ best efforts. Unethical behavior of any kind damages the DBM community, and should not be tolerated by any of its members.

 Academic Honesty

Academic dishonesty, either cheating or plagiarism (presenting as one’s own, the words or opinions of others), is regarded as a serious violation of both the academic and moral standards of VUSC. Dishonesty in a class assignment or test may result in disciplinary action ranging from a failing grade on the assignment or test up to dismissal from the program. It is the prerogative and responsibility of the instructor to determine if academic dishonesty has occurred and the seriousness of the infraction. The Department Chair and Dean are to be notified of instances of academic dishonesty.

Dishonesty in a class assignment or test may result in disciplinary action ranging from a failing grade on the assignment or test to dismissal from the program. It is the prerogative and responsibility of the instructor to determine if academic dishonesty has occurred and the seriousness of the infraction. The Dean and Provost are to be notified of instances of academic dishonesty.

Examples of a student committing plagiarism include, but are not limited to, allowing his/her work to be:

  • Part or all of an assignment copied from another person’s assignment, notes or computer file
  • Part or all of an assignment copied or paraphrased from a book, magazine, pamphlet or website
  • A sequence of ideas transferred from another source which the student has not digested, integrated and reorganized, and to which he/she fails to give proper acknowledgment

Examples of a student being an accomplice in plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

  • Allows his/ her paper or other assignment, in outline or finished form, to be copied and submitted as the work of another
  • Lends his/ her computer disk to another student or otherwise allows his/ her computer files to be copied for the purposes of plagiarism
  • Prepares a written assignment for another student and allows it to be submitted as another’s work

 Plagiarism

Definitions
To plagiarize is to present someone else’s work—his or her words, line of thought, or organizational structure—as our own. This occurs when sources are not cited properly, or when permission is not obtained from the original author to use his or her work. By not acknowledging the sources that are used in our work, we are wrongfully taking material that is not our own. Plagiarism is thus an insidious and disruptive form of dishonesty. It violates relationships with known classmates and professors, and it violates the legal rights of people we may never meet. Another person’s “work” can take many forms: printed or electronic copies of computer programs, musical compositions, drawings, paintings, oral presentations, papers, essays, articles or chapters, statistical data, tables or figures, etc. In short, if any information that can be considered the intellectual property of another is used without acknowledging the original source properly, this is plagiarism.

1.  Minimal plagiarism is defined as doing any of the following without attribution:

a.inserting verbatim phrases of 2-3 distinctive words.
b. substituting synonyms into the original sentence rather than rewriting the complete sentence.
c. reordering the clauses of a sentence.
d. imitating the sentence, paragraph, or organizational structure, or writing style of a source.
e. using a source’s line of logic, thesis or ideas.

2. Substantial plagiarism is defined as doing any of the following without attribution:

a. inserting verbatim sentences or longer passages from a source.
b. combining paraphrasing with verbatim sentences to create a paragraph or more of text.
c. repeatedly and pervasively engaging in minimal plagiarism.

          3.   Complete plagiarism is defined as doing any of the following without attribution:

a. submitting or presenting someone’s complete published or unpublished work (paper, article, or chapter).
b. submitting another student’s work for an assignment, with or without that person’s knowledge or consent.
c. using information from a campus file of old assignments.
d. downloading a term paper from a web site.
e. buying a term paper from a mail order company or web site.
f. reusing or modifying a previously submitted paper (e.g., from another course) for a present assignment without obtaining prior approval from the instructors involved.

Consequences
Minimal plagiarism. When instances of minimal plagiarism are detected, the instructor can use these situations as an educational opportunity to discuss with the student the nature of plagiarism and the values of a scholarly, Christian community. At the professor’s discretion, assignments may be rewritten and resubmitted, with or without a grade penalty. Repeated instances of minimal plagiarism may, at the professor’s discretion, be treated as substantial plagiarism. If the professor plans to exercise his or her discretion in cases of minimal plagiarism, procedures and consequences should be clearly described in the course syllabus.

Substantial plagiarism. For a first offense, the student typically receives a failing grade on the assignment that has been plagiarized, and a Report of Plagiarism is submitted to the Provost’s Office. For a second offense, the student typically receives a failing grade in the course, and a Report of Plagiarism is submitted to the Provost’s Office. For a third offense the student should be recommended for expulsion from the University. Action is taken at the discretion of the Provost.

Complete plagiarism. For a first offense, the student typically receives a failing grade in the course, and Report of Plagiarism is submitted to the Provost’s Office. For a second offense, the student is typically expelled from the college. Action is taken at the discretion of the Provost.

PROFESSIONAL CODE OF CHARACTER

The following Professional Code of Character is expected from all students:

  1. Integrity is a valued character trait. “People with integrity have firm footing, but those who follow crooked paths will slip and fall.” (Proverbs 10:9)  Students will:
    • Be righteously trustworthy. This includes refraining from plagiarism, cheating, or aiding another student in such. For additional information about consequences of unethical behavior students should refer to the Vanguard University Student Handbook.
    • Be Christ followers who keep each other accountable, as well as extending grace and encouragement.
    • Do work as unto the Lord. Student work is to be representative of their best effort, complete, and on time.
    • Be mindful that when we stumble we admit to it, repent, and seek restoration and forgiveness.
  2. Respectfulness is a valued character trait—of the Lord, to each other, of yourself, to your professor, and to staff and administrators. “Show proper respect to everyone; Love the brotherhood of believers, fear God, honor the king.” (1 Peter 2:17) Students will:
    • Be on time—to class or turning in assignments.
    • Turn off and put away cell phones while in class, performing an assignment, or taking an exam.
    • Use laptops in the classroom only as permitted by the professor for appropriate coursework. Any type of recording, copying, or photographing of the professor, fellow students, or course materials is not permitted without prior approval of the professor.
    • Practice appropriate attire and hygiene for a professional, university environment.
    • Use bathroom facilities before or after class.
    • Clean up after themselves. Eating or drinking in the classroom is permitted at the discretion of the professor.

 *All policies stated are subject to change per the current academic Catalog.  For more information, please see the 2015-2016 Catalog.