OC Register Recognizes Vanguard’s Veterans Courtyard of Honor and Dedication to Veterans

Vanguard’s Veterans Courtyard of Honor was dedicated yesterday with many veterans, community members and Vanguard staff, faculty and students present.  View photos from the event here, and watch a recap film from the celebration here. The Veterans Courtyard of Honor was built to serve as an enduring symbol of gratitude and commitment to honor the service of military personnel and veterans and is a beacon at the entrance to the University.  The university itself is built on the land where the former Santa Ana Air Base was located.  In 1943 the college received recognition by the government for the training of military chaplains.  Vanguard University trained chaplains who have served in WWII, Korean War, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Vanguard’s Veterans program gives veterans meaning and purpose in their life.  Many of the 30,000 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who return to California each year experience challenges when transitioning from military to civilian life.  Unemployment rates are high and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and other transitional challenges have led to an alarming spike in suicides.  Every 80 minutes an Iraq or Afghanistan Veteran commits suicide.  Education is the best transitional bridge for veterans because it provides hope for a better life through increased employability, higher income potential, and restored purpose and meaning through self-discovery.

Sgt. Brent Theobald, USMC, director of Veterans Affairs for Vanguard has many memories and has had much influence on the veterans program and resource center.  His reflective words bring a veterans perspective to the Veteran’s Courtyard of Honor. “Some of my closest comrades are buried in Arlington National Cemetery.  I recently visited Washington D.C. and the cemetery, where memories of serving as a marine in Afghanistan and Iraq flooded back.  Each veteran has his or her own memories that are as fresh as the day they were made.  Some memories we would like to forget, others stand as reminders of the greatest fraternity in our lives. Emotion overwhelmed me as the sun set across the hallowed ground of Arlington National Cemetery.  This is a great nation and I am thankful for the men and women who will raise their right hand to continue the legacy of service. Vanguard University is committed to honoring the legacy of all veterans while preparing the next generation as they transition out of the military during this difficult economic time.  Thank you to all of those who gave to make this Veteran’s Courtyard of Honor possible to serve our nation’s veterans.”

Below is an article by The Orange County Register in response to this momentous event at Vanguard.

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ROSE PALMISANO

THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

The Veterans Courtyard of Honor is a dream come true for Vanguard University President Carol Taylor, who began to dream of how to better serve veterans three years ago.

“Today, the dream became reality,” Taylor said during Courtyard of Honor dedication ceremonies Thursday at the Costa Mesa university.

More than 100 veterans and local supporters joined Brent Theobald, the Universities director of veterans affairs, government and community relations, and Vanguard’s Veterans Advisory Board to celebrate the new courtyard and to honor donors who made it possible.

Speakers, specials guests and the unveiling of “value pillars” dedicated to those who served in uniform were also part of the ceremonies.

Vanguard University is a private liberal arts university that is one of the few schools in the nation to have a courtyard specially dedicated to veterans, Taylor said.

“This is a space that visually says to veterans, ‘Welcome home. You are welcome here, and this now your home,’ ” Taylor said.

Read the full OC Register story.

Vanguard University Student Victoria Fry Receives Heart of the Teacher Award

Britney Barnes

Daily Pilot

Victoria Fry is turning her school struggles into inspiration for the next generation of students who feel they are failures too.

The 21-year-old Costa Mesa resident’s efforts haven’t gone unnoticed.

Dixie Arnold, chairwoman of Vanguard University’s Liberal Studies Department, presented Fry, who recently finished her bachelor’s degree there, earlier this month with the school’s Heart of the Teacher award. The award was created almost a decade ago and describes the love a future teacher has for people, Arnold said.

“She just shines,” Arnold said. “There is just this excitement for working with children.”

Fry said her “passion for teaching is rooted in the experiences I’ve had with other teachers, and also the experiences I’m having in the classroom rooting on those kids, encouraging them, saying, ‘This feels like an uphill battle, but trust me, you can do it.’”

Fry is staying at Vanguard to get her teaching credential and then a master’s in education.

Miguel Alaniz said in an email that Fry volunteers in his sixth-grade class at College Park Elementary School. She not only tutors the students, but also mediates group discussion with girls about social issues and helps resolve urgent problems while he teaches, he said.

She is a shining beacon of demonstrating that knowledge is power, Alaniz said.

“Victoria is a smart, kind and energetic volunteer who is willing to jump right in, be it teaching a science lesson, photocopying or helping a student one on one,” said College Park first- and second-grade teacher Susan McGuire in an email. “Miss Torrie, as she is called by my students, is a natural teacher.”

Fry’s decision to become an educator wasn’t a straightforward one.In elementary school, she felt incapable and inadequate. She would go home and cry.

She spelled words backward. Reading was a challenge, but she didn’t understand why.

“For me it was just like so discouraging, and it was such an uphill battle that I felt like a failure,” Fry said.

It wasn’t until high school that her problems were given a name: dyslexia. She was also diagnosed with a processing disorder.

But Fry overcame her struggles, graduating from Monte Vista High School at 16.

At Orange Coast College, though, she didn’t know which path to follow.

“I kept bouncing back and forth between a major in psychology and a major in education, because truthfully, all I really wanted to do was help people. That was it,” she said. “Whatever career I went into, I just wanted to do the most good.”

It wasn’t until she went to Vanguard — after turning down a scholarship from Chapman University — and met Arnold that she knew teaching was her calling.

Yet despite a nagging voice that questioned whether someone with learning disabilities should teach, she discovered that was the very reason she needed to.

“Within my time at Vanguard University, I really felt that that is why I should be an educator,” she said. “Because I know what it is like to fail miserably. Because there are so many kids in our school systems today that are failing and they need that hope, need that light to say, ‘No, no, no. You can get through this. You can climb this mountain.’

“I did it. I’ve been there.”

Read this article and other stories on The Daily Pilot’s website.

Journey of Faith: CBS 8 News Chief Meteorologist Ashley McDonald’s Mission Trip to Uganda

Daniel Okabe is currently studying Radio broadcasting at Vanguard University so he can return to Uganda to improve the quality of Faith Radio.  Impact Ministries started a Christian radio station in 2006 named Faith Radio. The radio broadcasts on 90.5 FM and covers Eastern Uganda in 16 districts, reaching over 10 million people with the gospel message. The radio broadcasts in English and all the local languages of Eastern Uganda namely Luganda, Swahili, Lumasaba, Ateso, Lunyole and Lugwere. It has a development program addressing problems like HIV/AIDS and poverty and the listening community is educated by experts hosted weekly.

CBS 8 News Chief Meteorologist Ashley McDonald embarked on a journey of a lifetime — a mission trip to Uganda.  Ashley spent two weeks in the African country, bringing food, clothes and hope to everyone she met.  She set a goal to feed the 700 orphans during her two-week visit where she was serving at Impact Ministries and Faith Radio. Following is an example of a typical day for Ashley on her trip.  Starting early, 8AM, with the opening assembly at the orphanage, Ashley would share a message with them and encourage them that even in their youth, they can set an example.  She taught them songs and they treated her to some praise songs in Luganda (the Language of Uganda). The children are taught in English and encouraged to speak English, so communication was not a problem and the headmaster had children recite memory verses.

After morning assembly, Ashley spent time at Faith Radio from 10AM-mid-day.  At noon, she went back to the orphanage where she spent about 20 minutes, each, with 3 different classes sharing the story of Christ with them. Pulling out her iPad Ashley played some worship songs for the children and encouraged them to sing along.  They were very aware of who Jesus is and what he did on earth. They were very bright children, but the work’s focus is to have these children turn head knowledge into heart knowledge. The night would wrap up with a women’s Bible study where Ashley was able to share messages and her testimony.  Ashley had someone with her at all times, because there is a lot of spiritual warfare and the Muslims have been pretty bold in attacking Christians.  She says she returned to Alabama with much more in return.  To view her story click here.

Broadcasting the Gospel through radio is one of the most effective tools for Evangelism and church planting.  Radio has helped reach villages and communities that could never have been reached with the Gospel. Through the Radio, the Gospel is heard in Military barracks and by Muslims and all kinds of people.

Vanguard Musician Samuel Hines Enters Prestigious Guitar Competition

OC Register

Vanguard University music student Samuel Hines has been selected as one of 15 finalists to compete against international guitarists for the prestigious Parkening International Guitar Award. Hines will play his chords in Malibu, Calif. from May 30-June 2, 2012 in hopes of winning the grand prize of more than $50,000, and the honor of being the world’s most talented guitarist in this category as a 20 year old (eligible classical guitarists range from ages 18-30).

According to Dr. James L. Melton, chair of the Department of Music at Vanguard University, “I can’t think of any of our music performance students more deserving in being a part of this international competition than Samuel Hines. He is very hard working and disciplined.”

This award was established in honor of Christopher Parkening’s lifetime commitment to fostering musical excellence in young artists and is the most prestigious classical guitar competition in the world. Each guitarist will be judged in four categories: musicianship, tone, technique and stage presence. The finalist with the highest score will receive the Gold Medal.

Vanguard’s accomplished music program has seen the concert choir perform regularly in venues such as Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center in New York.  The music faculty have advanced degrees from Juilliard, Yale and the New England Conservatory of Music.  They bring experience from the highest levels of performance.  Most are working muscicians who lend their talents to film soundtracks, television shows, jazz studio sessions, with performers such as Andrea Bocelli, Dave Koz and Barry Manilow, and in live performances at the Hollywood Bowl and Disney Concert Hall.  The director of the jazz ensemble spent eight years playing with the White House’s U.S. Marine Band.

For more information on Vanguard University’s prestigious music program, visit vanguard.edu/music. For more information on other academic programs offered at Vanguard University, click here.

Read the full OC Register story on their website.

Coast Magazine: Applauds Vanguard’s Gala Promoting Dignity of Women

COOL SCHOOLS

By  Kedric Francis

COAST MAGAZINE

Education is one of the pillars of philanthropy in Orange County, with fundraisers, galas and parties for public and private programs key components of the social whirl. The big guns get most of the attention, including Chapman U., UCI, OCHSA, and CSF. But community colleges and smaller schools deserve acclaim as well.

Vanguard University is a school we’re hearing more and more about, most recently when they hosted the Ensure Justice gala dinner at Santa Ana Country Club. The evening was a fundraiser to support the university’s Global Center for Women and Justice and its mission to promote the dignity of women locally and globally. The keynote speaker was author Rhonda Sciortino, and the Center’s director Sandra Morgan addressed the audience as well, passionately showing how supporters can help students learn to be a voice for the voiceless, including abused, trafficked and exploited women and girls.

Vanguard University is a private, Christian, comprehensive university of liberal arts and professional studies equipping students for a Spirit-empowered life of Christ-centered leadership and service. The U.S. News & World Report has ranked Vanguard among the best baccalaureate colleges in the west in their 2011-2012 rankings of colleges and universities and The Princeton Review named VU a 2011-2012 “Best in the West” College. Vanguard is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). www.vanguard.edu.

Full Story (page 48)