Vanguard University Recognized as a Top College for Teacher Education

college-rankingsVanguard University has been recognized in the Online College Database’s new ranking, “Top Colleges in California Shaping the Next Generation,” which honors the post-secondary institutions in the state that graduated the most education and teaching professionals in 2012.

According to The College Database, the organization that publishes the ranking,  programs offered in California were evaluated and ranked  according to reputation, facilities, and academic opportunities.

The College Database used the following methodology to identify the top colleges shaping the next generation:

-Must be fully accredited
- 4-year colleges only
- Public or private, not-for-profit colleges only
- No for-profit schools
- U.S. colleges only

In addition to meeting the criteria above, schools must have an education department and graduate at least 10 students per year at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Doug Jones, founder of The Colleges Database, said the schools that made the list each “help the educational ecosystem by fueling good teachers.”

To view the list of schools ranked in California, click here.  Please visit Vanguard’s undergraduate education program and for Vanguard’s graduate education program for more information about Vanguard’s professional and graduate degree programs.

 

 

OC Register: Homeless hot spots: Costa Mesa caring for ‘our own’

By MIKE REICHER

THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Costa Mesa residents, churchgoers, officials and others are helping the homeless off the streets.

That’s magnanimous by most accounts, but there’s a catch: They want to mostly help Costa Mesa residents, and discourage others from coming to town.

The first step in their process, a census and survey by Vanguard University, found a stable population between 100 and 120 locals. The homeless hot spots were mainly on the city’s Westside, near nonprofits and churches. Now, officials are finalizing their list of residents while stepping up their enforcement measures.

“We want to take care of our own, but we don’t want to be an attractant,” said City Councilman Steve Mensinger.

Click here to watch a video about a Costa Mesa church helping the homeless.

One of the men they are focusing on is Don, 50, a regular at the Lighthouse Church. Like many homeless, he prefers to use his first name because of the stigma.

On Monday, he met with city social worker Rosemary Nielsen – an impromptu chat about where he could live. A recovering addict with two dogs, Don is hard to place into limited housing.

Nielsen may soon have a new option: Officials are planning to convert an old motel into supportive housing and create an “adoption” program for people like Don – homeless with long-standing ties to the city.

But not everyone believes in the plan. Without other cities taking the same approach, some argue, Costa Mesa will just be pushing people around, to places with fewer resources. Some see the city’s social services as the big magnet – if they aren’t as selective as the city, why would people stop coming?

CITY TO FINALIZE LIST OF HOMELESS

The city is finalizing a list of roughly 100-120 chronically homeless people it considers Costa Mesa residents.

If they make the cut, homeless individuals may qualify for city-coordinated services like housing.

If they don’t, they have to rely on county, private or other resources.

Either way, people living on the street face heightened law enforcement and other measures designed to make Costa Mesa less inviting to them.

Officials call this a “carrot and stick” approach to ending homelessness in Costa Mesa. Here are some of the city’s actions:

Carrots

•Contracted with a mental health worker to assist police

•Worked with churches to open a storage facility for personal belongings

•Hired a part-time social worker, with plans to hire two more

•Working with faith-based community to “adopt” a homeless family or individual

•Seeking a developer to build supportive housing with mental health, job referral, and medical services

•Working with churches to reunite individuals with families in other cities

•Seeking funding for emergency motel stays, bus and airline tickets

Sticks

•Police issued 190 citations in Lions Park this year and made 52 arrests, more than doubling last year’s numbers

•Hired park rangers that patrol Lions Park and other parks, looking for violations

•Banned smoking in parks

•Banned extra belongings stored on bike racks

•Demolished shade structure in Lions Park

•Drafting a law against leaving unattended belongings in public

•Considering surveillance cameras in Lions Park

•Planning heightened enforcement of anti-camping laws

VOICES

Can it work?

“It would work if every one of our cities that border Costa Mesa embraced the same approach. Without that, we’re just taking homeless people somewhere else to be homeless.” -Ed Clarke, Vanguard University sociology professor

“I think the biggest obstacle is to keep them from coming. There are so many services…I don’t think they can ever stop the massive influx.” -Marisa David, resident of the Vendome Condominiums, adjacent to Lions Park

“A key aspect has to be housing and getting them off the streets. Something beyond providing meals.” -David Snow, UC Irvine sociology professor

For full story in OC Register Click HERE

Daily Pilot: Costa Mesa Homeless Interviewed, Counted

A consortium of churches and Vanguard University are trying to quantify the problem of homelessness in Costa Mesa’s borders

By Bradley Zint
DAILY PILOT

An initiative created by the Churches Consortium and Vanguard University is attempting to address Costa Mesa’s homeless population, one person and one interview at a time.

The volunteer-run YOU Count program involves taking a census of the city’s homeless population, followed by in-person interviews. The program is in its first year after a trial run last year.

The census portion began Monday. About 50 people took to the streets early that morning to provide an estimate of how many homeless are in the city.

“There’s no extrapolating data, no mathematical equations,” said Becks Heyhoe, a YOU Count organizer and director of the Churches Consortium, an alliance of churches mostly from Costa Mesa. “It’s literally who you see.”

Then throughout the week came the 44 interviewers who asked questions based on a five-page survey created by Vanguard sociology professor Ed Clarke.

To read DAILY PILOT click HERE

Daily Pilot: Colleges to Honor Veterans

By Britney Barnes

DAILY PILOT

Two local colleges will host ceremonies this week to honor the nation’s service men and women.

Orange Coast College and Vanguard University are hosting Veterans Day tributes Thursday and Friday, respectively.

OCC’s program, “Honoring Their Service and Sacrifice,” will feature a flag-raising ceremony, a panel discussion and guest speakers Charles A. Macias, the co-author of “Operation Legacy” and Joshua Stone, an OCC student and U.S. Army veteran.

The tribute begins at noon in the quad with the panel discussion immediately afterward in Student Center on campus, 2701 Fairview Road. Parking is free in Lot B.

Vanguard’s Veterans Day program will feature guest speaker Chris Kupitz, a student and veteran whose served two tours in Iraq. Vanguard will also honor the Orange County Freedom Committee.

The ceremony is from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Veterans Courtyard of Honor on campus, 55 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. [Click here to view a campus map of Vanguard University]

To read DAILY PILOT click here. To get more information on the Veterans Day event at Vanguard University, click here.

Huntington Beach Independent Recognizes Vanguard Promoting Laughter and Intrigue from the Stage

On Theater: Mistaken identity with a twist in ‘Errors’

By Tom Titus

HUNTINGTON BEACH INDEPENDENT

Shakespeare in his most riotous incarnation is the fare at Vanguard University, where director Susan K. Berkompas has added even more laughter to the Bard’s freewheeling farce, “The Comedy of Errors.”

Prior to the show, the cast comes out on stage to “explain” the plot to the audience. But don’t try to take mental notes and attempt to remember the details as the show progresses because the action is thrust into overdrive.

As Shakespeare details it, twin noblemen, both named Antipholus, are separated as infants in a storm at sea along with their twin servants, both named Dromio. They connect again, as adults, setting off a tsunami of mistaken identities.

Berkompas adds her own bit of comedy to these “Errors,” casting a white actor (Nick Lazaris) as one twin and an African-American actor (Preston Butler III) as his identical sibling who, visiting a rival city, unwittingly convinces everyone, even his brother’s wife, that he’s the “other one.”

Butler, who pretty much commands the first act, cuts a dominating figure, while Lazaris, featured in the second, finds himself incarcerated and handles the situation with well-placed bluster.

The servants (Christopher Orta and Luke Rhoades) encounter similar mix ups and endure a good deal of physical admonishment from both masters as they juggle the Bard’s confusing plot points — a ring, a necklace a bag of gold. To their credit, they do so admirably, both being quite adept at physical comedy.

Hailey Tweter is particularly effective as the wife of one Antipholus convinced she’s wed to another. Also impressive is Michael Fidalgo, who has a full plate of characters to enact, once during the same scene as he switches identities behind the backs of other characters.

“The Comedy of Errors” is quite entertaining, if more than a bit confusing, and it serves as a valuable lesson in high-voltage comedy from its student cast at Vanguard University’s Lyceum Theater.

To see the story click HERE